Corporate Services, Inc.
208 Kishwaukee St. · Rockford, IL 61104
(p) (815) 962-8367 · (f) (815) 962-0940
www.corpserv.com

Three Little Words Just Cost an Employer $50K

Posted:

A recent lawsuit taught managers what not to say as the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) showed, once again, that a small comment can end up costing an employer big.

Diverse Lynx, an IT staffing firm in Princeton, NJ, was slapped with an age discrimination suit after rejecting a older applicant.

'Age will matter'

According to the EEOC, after learning how old a job applicant was, the company emailed the applicant saying he would no longer be considered for the position because he was born in 1945. The email said "age will matter."

This is a clear violation of the Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967, the agency said.

EEOC senior trial attorney Rosemary DiSavino said the following:

A basic principle of anti-discrimination law requires that job applicants be judged on their individual qualifications. Employers that consider an applicant's protected trait, such as age, violate federal laws and will be prosecuted.

Payout, consent decree

Diverse Lynx agreed to settle the lawsuit for $50,000. But the payout is not the only consequence of those three words. The company also agreed to a consent decree, which means some major changes for them.

Diverse Lynx can no longer request an applicant's age during the hiring process. It must also conduct training for employees and managers that addresses federal anti-discrimination laws, and complaint and reporting procedures. Lastly, Diverse Lynx has agreed it will not retaliate against anyone who reports discriminatory practices.

Posted In: Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC); Discrimination, Illegal

Want to know more? Read the full article by Rachel Mucha at HR Morning

More News from Corporate Services, Inc.

Return of the ACA Individual Mandate: Could This Incarnation Catch On?

When the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) killed the penalty on the Affordable Care Act's (ACA) individual mandate, most employers believed the ACA was effectively dead. But some states did not think killing the mandate was such a great idea and put forward legislation to keep the mandate alive on the state level.more